Hats From the Past

Royal Hats 57 years ago to the January 30, 1965 funeral of Winston Churchill. Queen Elizabeth wore a black velvet tam by Aage Thaarup with tall stem and tiny rows of impeccable vertical stitching.

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Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother and Princess Margaret both wore dramatically shaped black turbans,

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Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester ore a draped embroidered turban style hat while her sister-in-law Princess Mary, Countess of Harewood, wore a black toque. The Duchess of Kent and Princess Alexandra wore veiled black pillboxes.

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Princess Marina of Greece wore a draped halo turban while and Queen Juliana of the Netherlands wore a large brimless fur hat. Prince Berhard starts on Queen Juliana’s right while on her left are are Charles De Gaulle and Grand Duke Jean of Luxembourg, all of the men in military uniform and caps.

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While the hats at events such as these are not the focus, they speak to a particular moment in time, and to the importance of the event to which they were worn.

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Danish Golden Jubilee

50 years ago today, Queen Margrethe II ascended the Danish throne following the death of her father, King Frederik IX.  While the current state of the pandemic forced the postponement of larger scale events celebrating this Golden Jubilee, Queen Margrethe was joined by her family today first for a visit the tomb of her father at Roskilde Cathedral followed by scaled-down celebration at Danish Parliament.

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To visit Roskilde Cathedral, Queen Margrethe repeated her grey fur bumper hat and matching coat.

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Controversy about fur aside, this design is a practical choice for an outdoor winter event. I just wish she had closed her coat to show off the striking diagonal stripes and give a sleeker overall look.

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Designer: unknown
Previously Worn: Feb 8, 2019

For the visit to Danish Parliament which followed, the Danish queen switched hats, donning the brimmed blue hat with striped feather trim which we first saw her wear last November. It was an unsurprising change for the indoor event, pairing Margrethe’s lovely blue suit with its matching hat. It’s a beautifully designed and finished piece, the feathers giving some welcome colour and textural contrast to the all-blue ensemble.

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Designer: Mathilde Førster (who deservingly received a Golden Jubilee “Medal of Remembrance” today!)
Previously Worn: Nov 10, 2021

Crown Princess Mary Mary repeated her ecru felt pillbox hat exquisitely trimmed in lace applique on one side.

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The pillbox adds subtle contrast to an overall look that is elegantly restrained- some might frown at the neutral ensemble but it feels so well suited for an event where another family member is clearly the star.

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Designer: Jane Taylor
Previously Worn: Mar 28, 2017

Princess Marie wore a new black straw beret percher trimmed with round disc flowers. Here’s an occasion where the whole is greater than the sum of its parts, the hat pairing beautifully with Marie’s black and white floral dress, black accessories and mint coat.

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Designer: Mademoiselle Chapeaux Paris. It is the “Fleur” design. 
Previously Worn: this hat is new

Princess Benedikte topped her magenta suit and purple cape in a new hat combining these two hues. The design features a magenta domed crown, purple bumper brim and a trio of twists in different saturated shades of pink on the side. Benedikte wears these berry shades so well and this piece is a fun addition to her wardrobe.

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Designer: unknown
Previously Worn: this hat is new

It’s lovely to see this milestone publicly marked today, especially with the debut of several new hats! What do you think about the hats in Copenhagen for Queen Margrethe’s Golden Jubilee today?

Images from Getty as indicated  

Danish Flag Day

Crown Prince Frederik and Crown Princess Mary Crown attended a service at Holmen’s Church and ceremonies at military headquarters Kastellet in Copenhagen and Christiansborg Palace Square on Sunday to mark Flag Day.

For this event, Princess Mary repeated her black straw picture hat with pleated brim ruffle on one side, returning the spray of cream and ecru straw leaves studded with feathers that adorned this hat on its first outing.

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This hat remains an elegant shape and scare for Mary and paired especially well with her printed black and cream dress.

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Designer: Susanne Juul
Previously Worn: Sep 5, 2019; Sep 5, 2017, May 27, 2016; cream hat trim was previously worn October 8, 2007

What do you think of this black and cream hat on Sunday?

Images from Getty and social media as indicated  

Ethiopian Royal Hats Part IV: Visits With Foreign Royals

I’m so pleased to welcome back longtime reader, hat aficionado (follow him on Instagram or Twitter) and friend of Royal Hats, Jake Short, for the fourth post in a 5-part series on the history and hats of the Ethiopian Imperial Family (see Part 3 here).  

Visits With Foreign Royals

State and official visits to Ethiopia and abroad were also more common during the later decades of Haile Selassie’s reign. In 1954 the Emperor, along with his youngest son Prince Sahle Selassie and granddaughter Princess Seble Desta (daughter of Princess Tenagnework), visited President Dwight D. and First Lady Mamie Eisenhower in Washington, DC (a clearer photo of this meeting can be seen here). Another visit to DC in 1963 saw the Emperor in a military cap and Princess Ruth Desta in a typical 1960s domed turban, while US First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy wore a pillbox hat (seen here in color).

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Haile Selassie visited the Netherlands in 1954 and was photographed holding a plumed ceremonial military hat while Queen Juliana wore a calot with swooping feather trim.

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Fifteen years later In January 1969, Queen Juliana reciprocated with a state visit to Ethiopia, accompanied by Prince Bernhard, Princess Beatrix and Prince Claus. For their arrival in Addis Abeba, Haile Selassie wore a formal bicorn hat while Juliana wore a black hat with woven halo brim studded with turquoise flowers. Princess Beatrix wore a tall, patterned turban.  

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During this visit, these wonderful photos were captured with the Emperor in his military cap and Queen Juliana in turbans- one covered in pleated ruffles and the other, smooth.

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During this trip, Queen Juliana was photographed at a children’s hospital in a capulet hat made of chunky, textured braid that was popular at the time. Another day, she repeated the black straw halo brimmed hat (with turquoise flowers removed!) while Princess Beatrix wore a white plaited pillbox.  On January 31, 1969, Queen Juliana wore a dark bumper hat while Princess Beatrix wore a navy brimmed hat in chunky navy straw braid with navy hatband tied in a side bow. Finally, Queen Juliana donned another turban for a visit to the Holy Trinity Ethiopian Orthodox Cathedral; Princess Beatrix paired a white and black pinstriped dress with a dark hat with wide, upturned brim

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King Paul and Queen Frederika of Greece visited Addis Ababa in 1959. Here they are seen with the Emperor and Empress, all wearing hats suited to their rank and typical for that time.

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A decade later in 1969, the Emperor met Pope Paul VI, who wore a white zucchetto skullcap.

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Again in his military cap, Haile Selassie is seen with other royals at a ceremony in Iran in 1971 to celebrate 2,500 years of the Persian Empire; Queen Fabiola and King Baudouin of Belgium (with Princess Anne of the UK behind them), Queen Ingrid and King Frederik of Denmark, Queen Anne-Marie of Greece (behind Emperor Haile Selassie), and Shah Reza Pahlavi and Shahbanou Farah Diba of Iran can be seen wearing hats (many more royals were also in attendance at this grand event).

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Relations with the Japanese Imperial Family, another reigning imperial family, were cordial and saw multiple visits. Haile Selassie visited Japan in 1956 with his eldest daughter Princess Tenagnework (seated, wearing a veiled calot), her daughter Princess Aida Desta (wearing a feathered casque hat), and Prince Makonnen, Duke of Harar. Crown Prince Asfaw Wossen and Crown Princess Medferiashwork visited Japan in 1959; while neither wore hats during a duck hunting session, their hosts Crown Prince Akihito and Crown Princess Michiko did. Crown Princess Medferiashwork was seen during this same visit in a toque-like hat during a visit to a department store.

Crown Prince Akihito and Crown Princess Michiko visited Ethiopia in 1960, with Akihito (carrying a top hat) being formally received by Emperor Haile Selassie at the airport. Crown Princess Medferiashwork wore a calot while she and Michiko visited a girls’ school; Medferiashwork was later seen in a headscarf when she accompanied Michiko and Akihito (both in hats) on a visit to Mt. Entoto just north of Addis Ababa.

Finally, there were multiple interactions with the British Royal Family. A 1954 state visit to the UK by the Emperor and his son the Duke of Harar began at Victoria Station, where Queen Elizabeth II greeted Haile Selassie, who wore a ceremonial military hat trimmed with lion’s mane!

The Queen Mother, Princess Margaret, Princess Mary, and Princess Alice, the Duchess of Gloucester, who all wore calots typical of the mid-1950s.

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The Queen wore a petaled/feathered calot as she, the Emperor, and the Duke of Edinburgh traveled to Buckingham Palace.

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A 1965 visit to Ethiopia by the Queen and Prince Philip saw only military hats from the host royals (the Empress had died in 1962, and there is a lack of photos of other female royals to determine their level of participation in the visit). 

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Queen Elizabeth, as you’d expect, wore several hats during this visit.

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While the visit saw no royal hats otherwise, there were many instances of tribal hats and headpieces worn by those who came to meet the royal guests.

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Another informative post, Jake- thank you! The Ethiopian princesses’ calots and half hats during the Japanese visit (and reciprocal visit five years later) are beautiful examples of fashion of the time! It’s also a fascinating reminder how millinery styles changed (inflated!) from the 1950s to the 1960s! How well did Queen Juliana’s cream turban pair with her 1960s sunglasses?! Such a fun look!

Jake returns next week for the final post in this series. 

Images from Getty and BNA Photographic

Hats From the Past

Royal Hats We began this week with a christening so let’s end it with one as well!

On May 28,1926, the Duke and Duchess of York christened their daughter, Princess Elizabeth, in the private chapel of Buckingham Palace. It’s a great look at millinery fashionable at the time with lavishly trimmed brimmed hats on Lady Elphinstone (the Duchess of York’s sister, far left) and Princess Mary (the Duke’s sister, far right) and cloche on the Duchess, a shape that would become her signature.

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Images from Getty as indicated