Most Flowers?

While many of us are practicing social isolation during this global health crisis, I thought it was a good time to bring back the weekly hat questions that have entertained us during quiet periods in the past (see an index of the hat shapes and trims we’ve explored here) and given us hours of fun research!

We’re going to restart this series back in Queen Elizabeth’s hat closet. We’ve seen her hats with the largest flowers  but which one of her hats contains the most number of flowers? Or has flowers covering the largest surface area?

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Photo from Getty as indicated

34 thoughts on “Most Flowers?

  1. None of these will win the prize, but they are some wonderful hats. Oh how MrFitzroy wishes this style could be modernized for contemporary wear somehow — as this genre of hat is a huge personal favorite on HM!

    Interesting with an outer wrap
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    Pastels in Belgium
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    Wonderful with a simple sheath
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    Perhaps add a few feathers into the flower mix…..
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    Love to see this one in color!
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    • I agree 110% Mr FitzroyCBE, I adore these flower hats on HM.
      I believe that HM could indeed carry off a version of these hats today– we have seen how her mother wore hats of this general shape well into her senior years and they suited her beautifully.
      I have always suspected that the queen has made a deliberate choice not to copy her mother’s style– especially in hats. That’s understandable and, i think, desirable; after all no two people are the same, and personal style should reflect that. I always feel a slight shudder when I see Anne copy her mother’s style in every detail, as she occasionally does– right down to the black shoes, black handbag and black or white gloves. No doubt for Anne, there is no significance in her doing so — her look would pass the “royally appropriate” test and that would be her main consideration –but I much prefer to see royals putting their personal stamp on what HM is said to refer to as “the uniform”.

  2. This one, by Aage Thaarup, was worn to Ascot in 1968. I’ve included a colour photo below to show its full beauty, taken by the Royal Collection Trust but unfortunately, is no longer available on their website.
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    • Great find, HQ. Those pink magnolias are so gorgeous. Love the Queen Mother’s hat too. The Queen Mother’s hats from the ‘fifties onwards are such a source of delight and interest! food for a similar series maybe?

  3. How could we forget this one with 25 bell flowers!
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  4. I think this is the most fresh flowers we’ve seen on one of her hats or headpieces- taken on a tour of the south Pacific on October 26, 1982. It’s worth noticing the bone necklace in combination with her ever-present pearls!

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    • I was thinking that the bone necklace was either presented to her or even ceremonially placed on her, maybe as part of a welcoming ceremony, as has occasionally happened with other royals. We would have to find a video to know for sure.

  5. June 28, 1967: Westminster Abbey wedding
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    • This looks like the one Shanon posted from1966 Ascot. Is it the same?

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      • Good catch, it looks like the same to me. Sorry for muddying the waters.
        Does Netflix have the 1980 movie “Stir Crazy” for us to enjoy today?
        This whole experience is making me think twice about retiring, for more than one reason!
        HQ, we need a Flashback or “Caption This” today. May I submit one?

  6. The poppy hat! And another Simone Mirman creation

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  7. I think this one deserves inclusion
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      • So fun! It reminded me of this flower printed hat
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  8. Am really enjoying seeing all of these posts and photos!

    I really like the current Queen’s hat in the first photo. It is similar to the hat worn recently with the gray checked coat and dress, I think. Not sure of the nomenclature to use for the style. Just like the high rounded crown and the scale of the upturned brim.

    Queen Mum’s hats are amazing!

    Thank you so much, HQ, for keeping this blog going. Grateful for the diversion.

  9. Here’s an interesting progression- the flowers on one of the flower covered 1960s turbans – ths one worn at the Royal Society’s Centenary at Marlborough house on June 26, 1968, seem to have been recycled a few years later to form the hatband on this design (sorry I’ve not yet located a photo I can post- Jimbo, can you help?!)

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    • February, 1977: New Zealand
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  10. Another flowered turban: Embed from Getty Images

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  12. The ’60’s sure were the flower decade!!

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  13. This is just from 1965….and features both Queen Elizabeths (to be fair, you didn’t specify which one HQ! 😉 )

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    • I forgot about this one with the daisy hatband- she were an updated version of the same idea to Ascot in 2004
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      • Different flowers, but same idea for 2019 Ascot:

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        • And in 1979
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    • Here’s a colour version of one in your gallery above
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      • She is incredible, isn’t she?!

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