This Week’s Extras

Empress Masako, Crown Princess Kiko, Princess Mako and Princess Kako wore pastel silk-covered small scale hats on December 23 for a visit to Imperial Palace for Emperor Emeritus Akihito’s 86th birthday.



On Christmas Day, Queen Sonja wore a chic brown fedora with striped hatband matching her scarf to Holmenkollen Chapel in Oslo.
French magazine Point de Vue featured an in-depth interview with Belgian milliner Fabienne Delvigne. It’s in French but with the help of an auto-translator, is still an interesting read.
The following new millinery designs caught my eye this week:
Adore the stitching detail on this grey trilby from Japanese millinery brand Maxim
Snazzy black knit ski hat with vibrant sequinned trim from New-York-based milliner Abigail Alridge
Textured ivory halo bandeau with flying baubles by Irish milliner Julie Kenny
Relaxed tan felt fedora with macrame side detail from American milliner Genevieve Rose
And the perfect headpiece for New Year’s Eve in cut charcoal grey feathers with a crystal studded veil from UK-based Italian milliner Guilia Mio
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My "Black Feathers" crown in all its glory! We could have gone for a classic total black look, but we thought that was a good idea to show how it beautifully sits with any other colour and style. The gown is an original '40 from Claire collection and it will be put for sale...eventually...😁 My "Black Feathers" crown is available to purchase (£285 +postage) and ready to be shipped in 2 working days! Make sure you get in touch fast, I'm going back to Italy for Xmas! photo @isoelegantweddings HAMU @pincurlsvintageservices . . @giulia.mio.millinery #bespokedesign #millinerycouture #headwear #partyheadpiece #bespokemillinery #feathers #festiveseason #party #xmasparty #newyearseve #giuliamiomillinery #giftideas #handmade #madeinleicester #leicester

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More lovely Christmas photo greetings from:  Prince Carl Philip and Princess Sofia;
the Dutch Royal Family;
the Cambridges;
and the Sussexes.
And finally, the Swedish royal family’s annual documentary of their year can be watched here– turn on closed captioning in Swedish then enable your browser’s auto-translator to read the text in your preferred language.

 

Photos from social media as indicated

This Week’s Extras

Great grey veiled hat on Princess Hisako last Sunday for a visit to Omiwa Shrine
The Japanese emperor and empress visited Nara and Kyoto this week. For their arrival on Tuesday, Empress Masko repeated a white silk bowler hat with  beaded hatband. For mausoleum visits on Wednesday, she wore a smart (new, I think) pale grey hat with short, upturned brim and horizontally pleated crown.


On Thursday, Princess Nobuko wore a fun dark blue crowned hat with black fur (maybe faux fur?) brim studded with tiny grey cut feathers to attend the 130th anniversary ceremony of the Japanese Red Cross Society in Yamanashi.
Also on Thursday, Emperor Naruhito and Empress Masako hosted a tea party for 600 people at Kyoto Imperial Palace. Empress Masako’s pale blue hat has a lovely wave sculpted into the upturned brim. Later that day, she wore a cream hat with short, kettle brim with wide, double layered peach silk hatband for her and the emperor’s return to Tokyo.


The following new millinery designs caught my eye this week:
Gently waved shape on this burgundy felt formed cap by Italian brand Galia et Peter
Wonderful white saucer of free-hand wired roses by Australian milliner Lisa Hughes
Absolutely exquisite feather work on this deep inky blue percher by UK-based milliner Guilia Mio
Such a lovely shape on this camel felt upturned brim design by British milliner Jane Taylor
Love the sparkling beaded veil on this black felt boater by Irish milliner Aiofe Harrison
Sunrise on a hat! Orange and red straw, crin and floral percher by Australian brand Locopa Designs
Fantastic movement on this charcoal felt percher with flying tails by British milliner Dillon Wallwork

And from Australian milliner Georgia Skelton, this lilac straw pyramid shaped hat with jaw-droppinghandmade open lattice brim.



Princess Aiko turns 18 tomorrow and to celebrate, the Imperial court released this video.
And because a giggle is always welcome, we end this week with a delightful anecdote told by Lady Pamela Hicks about her aging former Nanny and the Queen.
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A rather good Nanny story-

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Photos from social media as indicated

This Week’s Extras

Last Sunday, Beatrice Borromeo Casiraghi wore a burgundy velvet bandeau to Giorgio Armani’s Pre-Fall 2020-2021 Collection show.
The same day, Princess Tsuguko wore a hat in pleated pink printed silk with a mini rolled brim to take in the final match of the Japanese Squash Championship in Yokohama.
Also last Sunday, Queen Elizabeth repeated a turquoise straw Rachel Trevor Morgan designed hat to attend church.
On Monday, Emperor Naruhito and Empress Masako hosted the second Daikyo-no-Gi grand banquet. The Imperial Princesses were in attendance in a colourful array of hats.
On Wednesday, Princess Akiko attended the Japanese Chrysanthemum Flower Festival in Niigata in what looked like a burgundy fedora.
Lady Amelia Windsor shared photos of herself this week sporting casual winter hats- see here and here.
On Thursday, Emperor Naruhito and Empress Masako arrived in Mie Prefecture for a 3-day visit. For their arrival, Empress Masako wore a white hat with wide, beaded headband and kicky trilby-style brim. Yesterday, the couple visited Ise Grand Shrine to report recent enthronement and Daijosai ceremonies and worship. Arriving there, the empress repeated a cream jacquard silk bumper hat shown below. She and the emperor wore traditional dress for the ceremony (see photos here and here)


The following new millinery designs caught my eye this week:
Spectacular navy & silver pearl covered button percher with sleek feather trim by Irish milliner Teresa Nugent
Scarlet felt hat with pork pie crown, trilby brim and silk hatband
from British milliner Rose Collins
Pale lilac straw saucer with deep purple silk bias binding and bow explosion by British milliner Dillon Wallwork
Interesting cutwork (with peek-a-boo sequins) on this grey felt cloche by German milliner Stefani Garbrecht
Great colour and shape on this deep raspberry felt fedora by British milliner Tracey Miller
Stunning “Climbing Rose” headpiece in pale, tawny pink from Australian milliner Jill Humphries
Russian milliner Denis Gulyaev’s chic take on a trilby in mustard yellow with twisting charcoal floral & net trim
Grey felt unstructured beret with wonderful cut scroll trim by British milliner William Chambers
The most wonderful textured fuchsia and purple buclé fabric covered pillbox by Australian milliner Chris Mullane
Lovely tones in this rust felt fedora with copper hatband & golden feathers by Dutch milliner Amélie D’Hooghvorst
Fantastic denim blue straw bandeau with swirling feather trim by British milliner Isabella Josie
Pair of elegantly trimmed red felt beret perchers from Zambian-Dutch milliner Alice Ng’andwe Vermeulen
Such a darling tan and black houndstooth check cloche by Scottish milliner Maggie Mowbray

And from Surrey-based Karen Geraghty who works under the ‘Mind Your Bonce’ label, this midnight blue beauty with Dior brim and angular crown trimmed with sparkling winter night sky and shooting star.

Lovely group photo captured of the Grimaldi royal family members present at Monaco’s Fête Nationale celebration on Tuesday.
Royal photographer Chris Jackson took the most beautiful portrait of the Duchess of Cornwall this week during her and the Prince of Wales’ visit to New Zealand
We end this week with this gem from Queen Elizabeth.

Photos from social media as indicated

Imperial Royals Celebrate Daijosai

On Thursday and Friday, enthronement rituals concluded with The Daijosai (Great Thanksgiving Ceremony), a festival that dates back to at least the 7th century and is performed by a new emperor the autumn following his enthronement. This festival was held in temporary Shinto shrine compound called the Daijokyu, composed of nearly 30 buildings (about 6,500 square meters) specially built in the East Gardens of the Imperial Palace grounds for the Daijosai. For those of you in Tokyo, this will be opened to the public free between November 21 and December 8 before being dismantled, the wooden building materials being recycled for parks and disaster-prevention facilities.

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The Imperial Household Agency purchased specialty vegetables, fruit and seafood from each of Japan’s 47 prefectures for this festival. Rice was cultivated in two rice paddies in the country’s east and west with the locations determined by divination using turtle shells; special fabrics- hemp from Tokushima and silk from Aichi were also provided.

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The day began with Empress Masako arriving at the royal palace (earlier than the emperor, to prepare her elaborate costume) in a cream silk jacquard printed bumper hat.


For the ritual, the emperor wore white sokutai robes with the distinctive black kanmuri hat.

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The empress wore a traditional “junihitoe” multi-layered kimono, this one in white and peach, along with this Heian Era costume’s triple pronged silver headpiece.

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The Imperial Princess (I’ve spotted Kiko, Mako, Kako and Nobuko and suspect the other Mikasa and Takamado princesses also attended) wore a similar metal headpieces but with more delicate, beaded triple prongs (following a tree shape, I think?) and silk cord that loops around the top of the head and hangs down in a multi-bowed tassel on either sides of the face.


The event concluded with a banquet, hosted by the emperor and empress. The Imperial Princesses were in attendance, the Akishinos in cuffed calot hats, Princess Nobuko in a teal button percher, Princess Akiko in a brimmed cream hat, Princess Yoko in a pale blue percher, Princess Hisako in a green saucer with cream brim and flowers around the raised back, and Princes Tsuguko in a petal trimmed peach bumper.

Photos from Getty as indicated 

This Week’s Extras

Early last month, Princess Hisako and Princess Tsuguko took in events for the 74th National Sports Festival in a pair of pale hats. Princess Hisako also kicked this week off at the National Dietary Improvement Conference in Miyazaki in a very interesting hat with black brim and patterned burgundy silk crown and leaves at the side


Lady Kitty Spencer attended the Melbourne Cup Monday in a dark blue stemmed beret percher with leaf studded veil by Awon Golding and on Tuesday in a soaring brimmed black Stephen Jones creation.
Queen Sonja welcomed Slovenian president on a state visit on Wednesday in a powder blue and grey felt hat with cutouts across the front. At first glance, I thought it was a repeat but it’s new- and surprisingly close in appearance to its predecessor. 

 


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Also on Wednesday, Empress Masako arrived at the Imperial Royal Palace (to rehearse the upcoming Daijosai ceremony) on Wednesday in her almond silk covered bumper hat. On Thursday, Princess Akiko wore a grey hat with interesting upfolded brim on a visit to Fujinomiya to open the 7th World Tea Festival. 


Queen Margrethe opened an exhibition on Germany yesterday at the Danish National Museum in Copenhagen. She repeated her deep purple felt hat with sidesweeping brim and side bow.
The following new millinery designs caught my eye this week:
Fantastic fuchsia textured straw pillbox with oversize, flying pink bow by Australian milliner Irene Moore
London-based Irish milliner Philip Treacy’s lavender velvet felt trilby with silk hatband and fringed bow
Black straw hat with beautiful bias folded brim and feather trim by Dutch milliner Myra van de Korput
Graphic royal blue cutout origami halo bandeau by Australian milliner Lauren Ritchie
Black felt percher with crin ruffle and black and white feathers by British brand Hostie Hats
Whimsical lilac straw pillbox with statement silk allium flower trim by Australian milliner Victoria Henderson
Angular purple felt hat with the most fantastic folded ribbon hatband by Spanish milliner Eugenia Jimenez
From Australian brand Jack and Jill Millinery, a cheeky yellow straw brimmed cap with horse bit trim
Simple black felt cloche made special with added applique floral vines. Made by US milliner Jennifer Hoertz
Red felt button percher with impressively sculpted trim by British brand Gillys Millinery
Shell-shaped percher hat in striped tan and pink silk abaca with feather by Spain-based milliner Donna Hartley
Incredible gold bandeau headpiece with ombre stacked feather plume by Australian milliner Wendy Scully

And from Australian milliner Jo Peterson, this black disc edged in pink crin with amazing string art trim.


Imperial Enthronement: Ceremony

The main element in Tuesday’s Imperial Enthronement was the Sokuirei-Seiden-no-Gi, an official proclamation ceremony where the new emperor announces to domestic and foreign audiences that he has ascended the Chrysanthemum Throne.

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This ceremony took place inside the Imperial Palace before a large audience. Emperor Naruhito again appeared in sokutai robes, this time in the dark rust-brown colour reserved for his role, and the distinctive black kanmuri hat.

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Empress Masako wore a traditional “junihitoe” multi-layered kimono which dates back to the Heian Era (794 to 1185). In white, silver, red, coral,  purple, pale peach and green, the kimono is regal and dramatic, especially paired with the the elaborate sculpted sweeping ponytail that is worn with this costume along with a triple pronged golden headpiece.

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Crown Prince Fumihito wore saffron orange sokutai robes and a black kanmuri hat.

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The Imperial princesses also wore the traditional junihitoe with Crown Princess Kiko in shades of red, pink, orange, gold, white and purple, with a top robe in slate navy and the others in layers of green, navy, red, burgundy, yellow and white with a top robe in royal purple. Each wore the traditional spiky gold headpieces atop the costume’s dramatic hairstyle.

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Crown Princess Kiko

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Princess Kako and Princess Mako

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Princess Hanako

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Princess Hanako and Princess Nobuko in front; Princesses Akiko, Yoko, Hisako and Tsuguko in back

On their own, these spiky headpieces and tall hats seem so unusual but somehow, they add to the grandeur and strong sense of history at these events.

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Next up, we’ll look at the hats worn by royal guests.

Photos from Getty as indicated 

Imperial Enthronement: Morning Court Rituals

On Tuesday, the Enthronement of Emperor Naruhito took place with a series of ceremonies at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo. Empress Masako was spotted arriving at the palace early in the morning in a sleek,  unembellished bumper hat covered in a warm shade of ivory silk.

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Designer: unknown
Previously Worn: uncertain. I think it may be same hat was worn May 7, 2019; Mar 20, 2019; Jan 7, 2019; Dec 27, 2018

The day began with the ‘Sokuirei-Tojitsu-Kashikodokoro-Omae-no-Gi’ ceremony held at the Kashikodokoro Shrine within the Imperial Sanctuaries where Emperor Naruhito ceremonially announced the enthronement ceremony, which would shortly follow. For this event, the emperor wore traditional sokutai robes in white linen specifically cultivated for this event and a tall, black kanmuri hat.


Empress Masako wore a white and peach jūnihitoe, a formal ancient kimono, with multiple (at least 12) complex layers. The traditional costume includes a specific and rather distinctive hairstyle and triple pronged silver headpiece, worn just over the forehead.

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This ceremony was attended by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, select government officials and members of the Imperial royal family. The imperial princesses followed a traditional court dress code of gowns with ivory hats.

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Princess Kiko, Princess Mako, and Princess Kako all chose bumper designs with slightly different brim shapes and trimming.

While Princess Yoko was also in a cream silk bumper hat, her sister, Princess Akiko made a slightly different statement in a pillbox with textured vertical pinstripes, trimmed with a slim band around the middle of the hat that tried in a bow at the back.

The most interesting hats were, again, worn by the Takamado princesses. Princess Hisako’s bumper variation featured less structured sides that draped into some lovely movement. Princess Tsuguko was the only one to wear a brimmed design, trimmed with a slim bow at the front.

While I understand that a string of ivory hats might not seem exciting to western fashion sensibilities, I think there’s something serenely compelling and regal about it.

Photos from Getty as indicated and Sankei News