Hat From the Past

Royal Hatsto this day, 60 years ago. Fresh from a holiday and participation in the Red Cross Training program in Norway, Princess Margrethe of Denmark arrived at Victoria Station en route to her 21st birthday party at the Danish Embassy in London in a brimmed hat.

We’ll pop into her hat closet for an inventory next week.

 

Hats From the Past

Royal Hats to April 1944 and a wonderful snap caught at an 18th birthday celebration featuring a fascinating pair of hats. Queen Mary’s usual toque is replaced here by a jaunty design with upfolded brim trimmed with large flowers on the side. Princess Elizabeth’s pleated cap with visor brim has such a ‘military uniform’ vibe that one must look twice to see it’s not such. 

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Thanks to reader MittenMary for suggesting this photo to share!

Image from Getty as indicated

Hat From the Past

Royal Hats to April 5, 1939 and a wonderfully dramatic halo brimmed hat worn by Princess Martha of Norway on a visit to America.

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Image from Getty as indicated

Hat From the Past

Royal Hats to Queen Margrethe’s 18th birthday on April 16, 1958. For this coming of age milestone, she wore a lovely floral frock with matching calot hat. Photos from the time are all in black and white but, thanks to the Danish Monarchy, we have a view of it in full colour.

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Next week we’ll celebrate Queen Margrethe’s 81st birthday with another inventory of her hats- what colour would you like to see?

Images from Getty and social media as indicated

Hat From the Past

Royal Hats to sometime between 1850 and 1860 when this hat stepped out on the head of Queen Victoria. The caption describes it as “‘Calash’ style with wiring in silk casing. Plain weave silk, trimmed with silk ribbon, and inside with blonde lace and velvet flowers with aerophane leaves.” A ‘calash bonnet’ was a new hat style for me- see a great description here.

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It’s the placement of the flowers that intrigues me most here, tucked deeply inside the bonnet to closely frame the face. What do you notice about this fascinating design?

Images from Getty as indicated