This Week’s Extras

Princess Benedikte in a new brimless hat covered in feathers last Sunday at memorial service and wreath-laying in Spentrup to commemorate the 75th anniversary of Denmark’s WWII liberation
The Akishino princesses were in black hats today for the ttended the funeral of former Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone


Princess Charlene shared this sweet snap of Princess Gabriella in a velvet headband with bow, in a cuddle with her brother
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The following new millinery designs caught my eye this week:
Lovely lavender felt beret with feathers by London-based milliner Merve Bayindir
The most exquisite halo bandeau of ecru cut feathers, pearls and beads by Irish milliner Michelle Kearns
Sassy burgundy stylised trilby with silk binding and back bow by Czech milliner Jolana Kotabova
Pale yellow straw hat with windowpane brim and side trim by Australian milliner Catherine Kelly
Turquoise straw teardrop percher with veil and stunning feathers by Australian milliner Jill Humphries
Bright pink felt fedora with dotted hatband by France-based Spanish milliner Sylvia Martinez
Deep blue button percher with peacock and pheasant feathers by UK brand SB Millinery
Statement yellow oversize dome with fringed seams by Australian milliner Stacey Hemera Roberts
Chic leopard print felt cap with black velvet bow by UK brand Marrison Millinery
Sweeping silk pink, lilac and cream silk abacca design (see side view here) by Australian milliner Souri Sengdara

Luscious leaf green silk abacca head wrap with oversized flying bow by Australian brand Fox millinery
Charming textured natural straw percher with oversize white leather flower by Tasmanian milliner Cessiah Alice
Nude pink feather covered beret with gold quill & statement feather flowers by UK-based Stephanie Elizabeth Millinery
Bold pyramid hat design covered in red feathers by Australian milliner Cynthia Jones Bryson
Ombre dyed aqua straw boater (notice the beautifully dyed silk binding and hatband!) with feather wrap. By Australian milliner Stephanie Spencer

The Danish monarchy released four new portraits of Prince Christian to mark his 15th birthday
King Philippe welcomed his sister, Princess Delphine, for a meeting at Laeken Castle. Their joint statement not only recognizes Delphine’s title, but feels like the start of something good. Her interview on 60 Minutes Australia, taped before this meeting, is edited toward the sensational in my opinion, but still worth a watch.
Lovely to see the Spanish royal family this week at events for the Princess of Asturias awards and Spanish National Day
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Photos from social media as indicated

Guest Post: Cultural Millinery Part 3

This week, we’ve enjoyed a series of posts on the cultural side of royal millinery, brought to us by New Zealand reader Sandra. She is back today for the final installment in this series- Welcome, Sandra!

As we saw in the previous two posts, royals adapt their dress (and hats) to respect other cultures and they also accept the honor of wearing hats and costumes from other cultures. We also see numerous royals embracing the heritage of their homelands by wearing traditional and folk costumes.

The Norwegian royal women are often spotted on National Day, May 17, in a bunad consisting of a colourfully embroidered vest, apron, skirt, belt and ringed headpiece or lace trimmed bonnet. They also wear these traditional folk outfits for festive occasions, such as the recent confirmations of Princess Ingrid, Prince Sverre and Leah Behn.

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A beautiful family portrait taken for the 2019 confirmation of Princess Ingrid Alexandra shows the women of the family in bunads with personal connections. Queen Sonja (in a bunad from East Telemark) and King Harald gifted their grand-daughter a bunad from Aust-Telemark for her confirmation. Mette-Marit wore the Hardanger bunad given to her by that municipality for her 2001 wedding. 

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Queen Margrethe, Princess Benedikte and Queen Anne-Marie wore traditional bonnets on their visit to Klaksvig, Faroe Islands, in 1963. You can read more about Faroese traditional dress here

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For their visit to the Faroe Islands in 2018, Prince Frederick , Prince Christian and Prince Vincent wore folded red and blue striped woven caps; Princess Isabella and Princess Josephine wore traditional blue bonnets embroidered with flowers. 

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The Swedish royal women wear bright blue and yellow embroidered folk dresses each year on Swedish National Day. For the married women, this traditional dress also includes a white folded linen headpiece.

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For Prince Gabriel’s christening in 2017, Princess Sofia wore the traditional dress and beautifully embroidered cap from her home province of Dalarna (also the Duchy granted to the young prince at the time of his birth). 

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Princess Margaretha of Sweden is photographed with her two eldest children, all in Swedish folk costume, in London in 1966.

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The Scandinavian royals are not the only ones who embrace heritage clothing. Princess Alexandra of Hanover, standing between her parents Prince Ernst August and Princess Caroline, had trouble with the wind and the straw hat that forms part of traditional Monegasque dress. The family was marking the principality’s national day in 2007. 

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Many here will be familiar with the lace mantilla and high peineta comb which forms part of traditional dress for the royal women of Spain. In 2004, Queen Sophia wore one to the wedding of her son, (now King) Felipe.

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Queen Letizia wore a mantilla and peinetta in 2004 to meet Pope John Paul II at the Vatican. Interestingly, in 2015 she broke with tradition as a bearer of the national flag and didn’t wear black and a mantilla to a ceremony. Lace mantilla have been worn in Spain since the 17th century with the comb added in the 19th century.

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And, finally, taken around 1947, this photo shows the royal children of Greece skipping in their garden in traditional costume. From left, Princess Sophia (who became Queen of Spain), Crown Prince, later King, Constantine, and Princess Irene.

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I’m sure there are many more intriguing examples of cultural headwear to be seen and look forward to the comments section!

Immense thanks, Sandra, for this great look at royal hats with significant cultural meaning. For this week’s discussion question, let’s continue the dialogue that Sandra has already set for us, dearest readers- what other royal hats can you think of with cultural connections?

Guest Post: Cultural Millinery Part 1

I’m pleased to welcome back New Zealand reader Sandra to Royal Hats again. Sandra has prepared a 3-part series on a category of royal hats we don’t often discuss. Welcome, Sandra!

We’re so used to seeing the best of millinery craft on royal heads but there are occasions when a conventional hat simply won’t do, isn’t appropriate or when a local hat has been gifted. Excluding ‘diplomatic dressing’, here’s a selection of how some royals, male and female, have met the occasion.

Queen Elizabeth in Riyadh, the capital of Saudi Arabia, in 1979. She pinned the turban’s long scarf with the beautiful sapphire and diamond Prince Albert Brooch, given by the groom in 1840 to his bride, Queen Victoria, the day before their wedding. This is the darker of two blue turban-style hats she wore on this trip with long daytime dresses.

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I feel that someone in Dubai was taking very close note of this 1979 outfit worn in Kuwait … someone who would go on to design the stewardess outfits for the Emirates airline. 

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The Dutch are a nation of pragmatists so it’s no surprise that Queen Beatrix took a no-fuss approach during a mosque visit in Abu Dhabi in 2011 – she simply donned a cloak, perhaps provided on site, and tied a scarf over one of her trademark ‘cake’ hats. Done!

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And again, this time in Oman in 2012 (I love Maxima’s entire outfit but particularly her shoes).

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Queen Elizabeth did something similar for her visit to The United Arab Emirates in 2010. The dress and pillbox hat she wore to step off the plane were designed with a matching embroidered coat and veil that attached to the hat she put on when she and Prince Philip visited the Sheikh Zayed Mosque.

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How diplomatic is it to wear a hat with echoes of a nation’s colonial past when one is a member of the former overlords? Perhaps the Duchess of Cornwall, pictured in India in 2006, is wearing this pith helmet sunhat with irony, or even in a post-modern conceptual way!

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And proving that context is everything, I don’t find the same hat so disconcerting on this outing in Egypt on the same tour. Don’t you love the battered brim of Charles’ hat? I can imagine this might be his gardening hat at Highgrove!

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Thanks Sandra! This brings to mind another hat worn by Queen Beatrix. When she visited the Blue Mosque in Istanbul on March 1, 2007, her hat choice was not only blue, but one decorated with crescents all the way around the brim (the crescent a widely used symbol of the Ottoman Empire and, by extension, Islam).

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Stay tuned for Part 2 of this series tomorrow!. 

This Week’s Extras

Back on September 26th , Princess Benedikte opened an exhibition by sculptor Helen Schou at Randers Art Museum⁣⁣. She wore a blue woven raffia hat embellished with a looped bow beneath the upswept brim.

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في ٢٦ سبتمبر ، افتتحت الأميرة بنديكت من الدنمارك معرض للنحاتة هيلين شو في متحف راندرز⁣ .⁣ في ٢٨ سبتمبر زا⁣⁣ر الأمير فريدريك مدرسة سوفينبورغ بمناسبة مهرجان العلوم .⁣ في نفس اليوم ، منحت الملكة مارغريت جائزة رونغستيدلوند للمؤلف والصحفي بوك دامسغارد .⁣ ⁣ ⁣ ⁣⁣ On September 26th , Princess Benedikte of Denmark opened an exhibition by sculptor Helen Schou at Randers Art Museum⁣⁣ Crown Prince Frederik visited on 28 September Sophienborg School in Hillerød on the occasion of the Science Festival.⁣ On the same day , Queen Margrethe awarded the Rungstedlund Prize 2020 .⁣ ⁣ ⁣⁣⁣ 📸 : ⁣ Roar Paaske, Randers Kunstmuseum / Roar Paaske⁣ / Keld Navntoft, Ritzau Scanpix / MARTIN HØIEN ⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ ⁣ ‏#kronprinsfrederik #crownprincefrederik #detdanskekongehus #kongehuset #kungligt #royalfamily #theroyalfamily ⁣ ‏#danishroyalfamily #danishroyals #queenmargrethe #dronningmargrethe #princessBenedikte #prinsessebenedikte⁣ ⁣ #العائلة_الملكية #العائلة_المالكة_الدنماركية #الأمير_فريدريك #أحداث_ملكية #أحداث_ملكية_2020 #الاميرة_بنديكت #الملكة_مارغريت

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The following new millinery designs caught my eye this week:
Wonderfully quirky blue straw bandeau trimmed with hand rolled straw pencils by UK brand Warrillow Studio
Luxe maroon felt stylised trilby with double vertical side bow by American milliner Jennifer Hoertz
Pink straw lovely shaped saucer with dusky rose silk flowers by Dutch milliner Daphne Fernandius
Fantastic hand rolled, strolled and stitched headpiece in ecru and blue straw by Australian milliner Jill Humphries
Sleek and elegant grey straw cartwheel brimmed hat with statement flower by Czech milliner Jolana Kotabova
Black straw bandeau with braided scrolls and flowers by Texas millinery brand The Mad Duchess
Matching shoes, clutch and button percher in vibrant peacock printed velvet by France-based milliner Sylvia Martinez
Super high halo bandeau in pleated silver satin by British milliner Victoria Charles
Magenta halo bandeau with handmade hydrangea trim by UK-based Italian milliner Guilia Mio
Royal blue felt upturned brim with black braid Mondrian design by German milliner Angelika Löbering

Flax yellow straw draped percher with beads by Australian brand Natalie Jane Millinery
Dramatic tiered black felt pyramid hat by Russian milliner Lia Gureeva
Red felt fedora with fantastic trio of trimmed black feathers by Canadian milliner Truly Carmichael
Blush straw percher with grey quill and feather flower by UK brand Stephanie Elizabeth Millinery
Large natural straw hat with beehive shaped crown and fantastic garden of layered applique flowers covering the braid-edged wide brim. Made by Australian brand Belle Folie Lifestyle

As per Luxembourg royal tradition, a new rose was christened on Tuesday in honor of Prince Charles. The Hereditary Duke and Duchess also gave an interview on their experiences with parenthood so far.
Snippets from a press conference on Monday with Delphine Boel, who, based on DNA testing, has won the right to use her father’s last name and title of Princess of Belgium. It’s a sad story all around that could have had such a different (healthier, more positive for all) outcome.


We end this week with Prince William’s tour of Bug-ingham Palace. So sweet!

Photos from social media as indicated

Spots?

As per your request, dearest readers, today’s question is dotty one- which royal hats can you recall with spots?

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Photos from Getty as indicated