Princess Beatrix Opens Exhibition

Princess Beatrix made her first appearance since the summer yesterday, opening an exhibition on trees in Dutch paintings at the Dordrechts Museum

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For this event, she repeated an emerald straw hat with layered bumper brim, trimmed with side loops. The colour is another festive choice that’s simply lovely on her and the signature scale and shape of this piece is a welcome bit of millinery familiarity during this time when we are seeing so few royal hats.

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Designer: Suzanne Moulijn
Previously Worn: November 15, 2019

What do you think of Princess Beatrix’s hat yesterday?

 

Photos from Getty and social media as indicated 

Bourbon Parma Wedding Ten Years On: Family & Guests

Prince Carlos and Princess Annemarie of Bourbon-Parma celebrated their 10th anniversary last week. Yesterday we looked at the bride’s attire– today we look at hats worn by family and royal guests.

The groom’s mother, Princess Irene wore a statement pinwheel fascinator of purple feathers. Fascinators such as this one were still popular at the time (we’ll see several more at this wedding) and while this one was on-trend in terms of style and the colour was lovely, I think its scale overwhelmed Irene.

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Princess Margarita, who attended the bride and helped maneuver her 4 meter long train, topped and adorable red coat with a pleated bandeau headpiece trimmed with feathers on one side. The scale of the piece is lovely on her and just right for a head-to-toe ensemble in one colour- a bigger hat would have been too much. While bandeau headpieces are very popular today, this one was ahead of its time!

Nov 20, 2010 | Royal Hats Nov 20, 2010 | Royal Hats

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Princess Carolina paired her stunning amethyst silk dress with a silvery grey straw fasciator studded with purple and grey feathers. As far as fascinators go, the crescent shape of this this one worked really well, not only to frame Carolina’s face but to give some presence to the piece. Both the shape and colour made the piece a great pairing for the dress, linking with the handpainted pattern on the skirt and complimenting, rather than competing with the cowl neckline. While fascinators such as these seem a bit dated now and the feather placement on this design isn’t perfect, ten years ago, I adored this look on Carolina.

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Queen Beatrix wore one of her signature oversize pillboxes, this one in the loveliest shade of slate blue. The hat paired beautifully with her both her blue jacquard silk dress and her fur-trimmed cape, the latter giving the most wonderful “ice queen” vibe, in the best possible way.

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Princess Máxima wore a simple black beret percher overlaid in pale grey and black net veil by Dutch milliner Irene Bussemaker. The veil is the star on this design, adding wonderful texture and softness to the otherwise stark piece. It’s not a showstopper hat for Máxima but, I suspect, that was the intent.

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Princess Laurentien topped another head-to-to red ensemble in a percher saucer hat trimmed in red guinea fowl feathers. While the numerous textures in this overall look might seem a bit much, they save it from being one note. I think the hat was a triumph, its scale so great on Laurentien (particularly with her characteristically sassy haircut) and the feathers a whimsical yet effective touch.

Nov 20, 2010 | Royal Hats

Princess Mabel leaned into the fasciator trend with a large headpiece of black feathers. A decade of time since first seeing this outfit has not warmed me any more to it- while the fascinator linked with the coat and the top linked with the skirt and shoes, these two halves seemed at odds and the overall look just didn’t mesh.

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While Princess Margriet, Princess Annette and Princess Anita  did not wear hats, Princess Marilene topped her Valentino coat with a lilac crin bow fascinator studded with goose and coque feathers, net veiling and tulle. While the design was fine, I’ve always felt her lovely coat deserved a much more refined hat. Something wide brimmed in felt the same shade as the coat’s velvet bow would have been so much better.

 Nov 20, 2010 | Royal Hats

Princess Aimee wore a white fascinator of ruffled straw. I prefer the look of this fascinator, which almost reads as a cocktail hat, to the feather explosions seen on other heads here, but always felt it was too summery for a November wedding. Perhaps she had planned to wear it for the originally scheduled date in August? Either way, cocktail hats were popular ten years ago and I think something in navy felt would have made a better pairing.

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The final Dutch royal hat at this wedding was worn by Princess Christina. Her tangerine straw callot was studded with black and orange feathers. The hat’s link to the black, yellow, caramel and coral floral print on Christina’s coat is obvious yet still incongruous…  and too Halloween-y. I think a solid colour hat would have been the way to go here.

The only hat on a royal guest was this wonderful purple felt cloche worn by Countess Diane of Nassau, wife of Prince Jean of Luxembourg. The design appears to be trimmed with a pair of slim, layered hatbands and a ruffled side bow at the side with feathers. It’s a classic piece that was elevated by its unexpected, yet very effective pairing with Diane’s fuchsia frock.

Nov 20, 2010 | Royal Hats

Looking back at past events is always an interesting glimpse at style trends at that time and this flashback is no exception. Which millinery looks have best stood the test of time? Which do you think are best left in the past?

Photos from Getty as indicated; PPE/Nieboer; PPE/Nieboer; PPE/Nieboer; Olivier Polet/Corbis, and Olivier Polet/Corbis, via Getty; Patrick van Katwijk/Monarchy Press; Patrick van Katwijk/Monarchy Press; PPE/Nieboer; Corbis; PPE/Nieboer; Corbis; PPE/Nieboer; Mark Renders/Getty Images; Jeroen Van Der Mejde/ANP Photo News

Bourbon Parma Wedding Ten Years On

Prince Carlos and Princess Annemarie of Bourbon-Parma celebrated their 10th anniversary last week. Today and tomorrow, we’ll mark this anniversary with a look back at their religious wedding.

The couple was married civilly on June 12, 2010 in Wijk bij Duurstede in the Netherlands. Their church wedding was scheduled to follow on August 28 but was postponed due to the August 18 death of the groom’s father. Following a suitable period of mourning, the wedding was held November 20, 2010 in La Cambre Abbey in Brussels, the city where the couple met. Annemarie Gualthérie van Weezel was a parliamentary journalist in The Hague and Brussels for the Dutch public channel NOS while Prince Carlos w as a public affairs consultant for European Public Policy Advisors (EPPA).

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Annemarie turned to Brussels designers Jacques Devos and Pamela Hoffman for her wedding dress. They created an off-the shoulder gown in ivory silk with crossover V-neck ruched bodice and three quarter length sleeves.

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A slim silhouette followed the empire waist to the knees where it opened into a trumpet skirt. The back of the skirt flowed into a circular two meter long train.

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Annemarie wore the Dutch emerald parure tiara, a convertible piece with emeralds replaced with diamonds and pearls. Her veil was made by Belgian artist Isabelle de Borchgreve out of….. paper! Chosen with a concern to sustainability (it was reported that Carlos and Annemarie wanted to emphasize their concern for a more sustainable world, the veil was handpainted and, as you can see here, was indistinguishable from lace (see its detail here, here and here). The ensemble was completed with pearl and diamond drop earrings and a white and pink bouquet.

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Ten years on, this gown has held up well. The paper veil is astounding, it’s  lace pattern pairing so well with the silk gown , giving both textural contrast and interest while not throwing the overall look out of balance. That’s not to mention the million points it already earns for its sustainability. The tiara was a bit too pointy for my taste but I can appreciate how the shape mirrored the gown’s neckline and I adore how the scalloped edge of the lace veil beautifully framed Annemarie’s beaming face. The whole look suited her well.

Today, the couple are parents to two daughters, Princess Luisa and Princess Cecilia, and a son, Prince Carlos.

Tomorrow, we’ll look at hats worn by family members and royal guests to this wedding. For now, I’m curious, dearest readers- what do you think of this bridal look a decade on?

Photos from Getty as indicated 

Dutch Queen Reopens Haarlem Museum

Queen Máxima was in Haarlem yesterday to open the renovated Museum of the Spirit. To visit this collection of 700 years of healthcare history and contemporary art, she repeated her charcoal felt brimmed hat with sharply upturned slice brim.

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It’s a great go-to look for the Dutch queen and the hat pairs well with this grey dress, leaving its statement ochre yellow lace overlay skirt as the star. This event is this hat’s 11th outing- an understandable statistic, given its neutral colour, but surprising to me nonetheless. I don’t feel the same saturation with this piece as I do with other frequently worn hats we see, perhaps thanks to the significant lengths of time in between each outing, the different ensembles it has topped or it’s streamlined design?

Designer: Fabienne Delvigne. Dress by Natan.
Previously Worn: Oct 10, 2018; Feb 8, 2017; Feb 16, 2016Dec 8, 2015Mar 19, 2015Feb 17, 2015; Apr 5, 2014, Jan 30, 2014Oct 16, 2013Oct 5, 2013

What did you think of Queen Máxima’s grey hat on this occasion?

 

Photos from Getty and social media as indicated 

Double Hat Day For Dutch Queen

Queen Máxima celebrated to anniversaries in The Hague today with two repeated hats. To kick off the annual breast cancer month, which coincided with the the 40th anniversary of the Breast Cancer Association Netherlands, she repeated her vibrant pink straw picture hat with sharply sidesweeping ‘slice’ brim.

The choice of pink, the colour associated globally with breast cancer, was clearly not coincidental and makes a happy, vibrantly hopeful statement during a time when such things are so very needed. We’ve talked before about how well this signature shape works for Máxima and while the overall ensemble could have been more polished (a neat chignon so her hair didn’t compete with those statement earrings), it’s so good to see an old-friend hat such as this that the rest doesn’t seem to matter.

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Designer: Fabienne Delvigne. Dress by Natan.
Previously Worn: August 31, 2019; July 3, 2016; April 13, 2016April 27, 2015

This afternoon, Queen Máxima attended the 70th jubilee celebration of the Social Economic Council. For this event, she changed into her saffron silk pleated dress and matching bandeau circle headpice

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We’ve not seen this headpiece since its debut in Japan six years ago. What to say… it allows the dress to shine? It does, and that’s a good thing. While shape and execution fall flat for me (I wish the graphic pleats of the dress translated more to the headpiece), the colour is spot on, both for the House of Orange and for a fall (in the Northern Hemisphere!) day.

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Designer: Fabienne Delvigne. Dress by Mattijs van Bergen
Previously Worn: October 29, 2014

Queen Máxima has given us several hats and headpieces over the past two weeks and two more today… well, dearest readers, I know we will all appreciate! What do you think of these two designs today in The Hague?

Photos from Getty as indicated