Monday Multiples: Queen Elizabeth

Thanks to Jimbo for providing the introduction and background research for the posts on Queen Elizabeth featured in this “Monday Multiples” series.

Jimbo’s Introduction: Queen Elizabeth is always pretty in pink when she is out and about. She wore a wonderful pink, brown and blue bouclé coat with two coordinating hats- straw on October 19, 2013, (perhaps the only photographed time for this hat) to the British Champions Day at the Ascot Racecourse and felt on February 2, 2014 to attend church in West Newton (She was spotted two more times wearing it for outdoor events – the Newbury Races on April 21, 2017, and the Braemar Games in Scotland on September 2, 2017). Whether her hat was straw or wool, the Queen always accessorized it with her charming smile.

Look #1: with the pink straw hat – textured parasisal on the crown and lighter sinamay on the mushroom brim – trimmed with a wide hatband bound in the same bouclé as the coat and coordinating feathers worn October 19, 2013 to Ascot Racecourse.

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Look #2: with a similarly shaped hat in pink felt trimmed with a braided hatband of scalloped-edge felt strips and blue and copper curled feathers worn February 2, 2014, April 21, 2017 and September 2, 2017

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Both hats were designed by Angela Kelly and made by Stella McLaren. The question is- which hat do you prefer most with this coat?

Photos from Getty as indicated 

Hat From the Past

Royal Hats 49 years to October 14,1971. Queen Elizabeth visited Scammonden Reservoir in West Yorkshire in this graphic floral textured turban. You’ll see from the bottom photo (taken in Canada in May of the same year) it’s a vibrant red. Talk about flower power!

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Queen Elizabeth II, Governor General Michener, Mrs. Trudeau and Prime Minister Trudeau on route to Victoria, B.C. May 3, 1971. (CP PHOTO/Bill Croke)

Photo from Getty as indicated

Queen And Duke of Cambridge Visit Science Lab

Queen Elizabeth and the Duke of Cambridge visited the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) at Porton Down Science Park near Salisbury yesterday. To view counter intelligence tactics, a demonstration of a Forensic Explosives Investigation and open the new Energetics Analysis Centre, the queen repeated her dusty pink coat and hat with domed crown and downward facing brim, trimmed with black and pink hatbands and a side spray of handmade silk flowers.

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While the hat is covered in the same brushed wool as the Queen’s coat, the overall ensemble does not suffer from ‘one note syndrome’ thanks to contrast provided by the slim black hatband and lovely silk flowers adding some dimension and colour to the design. It remains an impeccably finished and beautifully balanced design.

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Designer: Rachel Trevor Morgan
Previously Worn: Mar 13, 2019Mar 27, 2018

What do you think of this hat on its third outing?

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Photos from Getty as indicated 

Hats From the Past

Royal Hats to September 5, 1932, 88 years ago, and a very sweet tam-sporting Princess Elizabeth returning to Balmoral Castle from attending Sunday morning service at nearby Crathie Kirk with her grandparents. Queen Mary’s pleated toque hat is embellished with fabric leaves and a diamond brooch, an addition that also seems to be on her granddaughter’s tam, in mini version.

Photo from Daily Mirror/Mirrorpix/Mirrorpix via Getty Images

Hat From the Past

Royal Hats to July 1,1949 when Princess Elizabeth opened the Avon Tyrrell Centre for young people in a wonderful calot hat with bonnet style brim- a brim covered in silk flowers or lace that frames the young princess’ face with a sun-filtered lovely pattern.

The Avon Tyrrell Centre now hosts an outdoor activity center run by British Charity UK Youth, a charity whose patron is Princess Anne. To celebrate the Princess Royal’s 70th birthday, British sculptor Frances Segelman created a striking bust of her that will now be housed at the Avon Tyrrell Centre, 71 years after her mother opened it.

Photo from Getty as indicated