Remembrance Sunday 2020

Members of the British royal family attended the National Service Of Remembrance at the Cenotaph in Westminster today. The Prince of Wales, Princess Royal, Dukes of Cambridge and Kent, and Earl of Wessex took part in the ceremony, which was considerably scaled back from years past (26 former service men and women took part in stark contrast to the more than 10,000 veterans usually included in this event).

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The Queen, Duchesses of Cornwall and Cambridge, and the Countess of Wessex looked on from balconies above the Cenotaph.

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Queen Elizabeth wore a new black hat with slightly angled stovepipe crown and cartwheel brim, edged in a wide stripe of black binding. The hat is trimmed with a spray of overlapping stitched leaves and a small side bow.

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Designer: unconfirmed
Previously Worn: this hat is new

The Duchess of Cornwall repeated a black felt beret hugger percher wonderfully trimmed with black felt and jinsin twists sweeping over the hat, studded on the side with a large black silk bloom.

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Designer: Philip Treacy. Dress and Coat by Bruce Oldfield.
Previously Worn: Mar 13, 2014

The Duchess of Cambridge wore a new percher hat with saddle shaped velvet felt base, embellished with a beautifully proportioned multi-looped silk bow.

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Designer: Philip Treacy “OC 784” from AW 2020. Coat by Catherine Walker
Previously Worn: this hat is new

The Countess of Wessex was also in a new hat, her fur felt pillbox trimmed with a sweeping embroidered feather applique.

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Designer:  Jane Taylor “Felt Pillbox with Embroidered Feather Trim” from AW 2020. Cape by Zara.
Previously Worn: this hat is new

While the hats at such events are secondary, this quartet really is stellar.

Photos from Getty as indicated 

Hat Renovation Teaser

During the summer, British milliner Amy Morris-Adams shared a photo of several vintage hats she was working on updating, mending and retrimming. I really appreciated her approach to this, sewing each hat’s original labels back inside after the work was done.

Interestingly, Amy offered Royal Hats a teaser not only that these hats belonged to Princess Anne, but that we should keep our eyes open for them, soon. Any guesses which hats from Princess Anne’s wardrobe these might be?!

Photos from social media as indicated 

Hat From the Past

Royal Hats to October 1, 1971 when Princess Anne donned this lime tassel-trimmed newsboy cap to present new colours to the first Battalion, Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters Regiment at Battlesbury Barracks. I’m at a loss for words on this one.

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Photos from Getty as indicated

This Week’s Extras

Princess Anne in military uniform on Friday to visit the 30th Signal Regiment to mark the 71st anniversary of The Queen’s Gurkha Signals.
The following new millinery designs caught my eye this week:

Delicately beautiful pillbox entirely covered in small blooms by London-based milliner Merve Bayindir
Large tan straw teardrop saucer with black veil and multicoloured butterflies by Czech milliner Jolana Kotabova
Green velvet halo bandeau with beaded trim by American brand Suzanne Couture Millinery
Natural and blue straw layered percher with beautiful silk abaca flowers by Australian milliner Sandy Aslett
Textural bandeau headpieces of overlapping jewel-tone straw feathers by British milliner Bee Smith
Wonderfully simple yet striking white straw cloche with navy applique trim by New Zealand milliner Anel Heyman

Lovely silver button percher with dimensional lace trim by London brand John Boyd millinery
Straw crowned boater with perspex brim and blue butterfly trim by British brand Bundle MacLaren
Camel mariner cap with removable brass floral trim by Italian brand Borsalino
Pale green straw wide brimmed hat painted with bird and vines by Spanish artist Lidya Diaz
Amethyst velvet wrapped turban by London-based Irish milliner Philip Treacy
Charming Bee hat – honey parasisal straw, wired honeycomb and buzzing straw bees – by British milliner Karen Geraghty

 

The Hereditary Grand Duke and Duchess of Luxembourg were joined by family yesterday for the christening of their son, Prince Charles, at the Abbey of St. Maurice in Clervaux
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The Earl and Countess of Wessex and family took part Great British Beach Clean on Southsea beach in Portsmouth, today
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“Colour From the Soul” photo from James Ogilvy

Photos from social media as indicated

Life Of A Hat: Princess Anne

Most of the royal hats we see stay the same during their working lives. Some might be paired with different ensembles but a vast majority stay in their original form.  However, while wading around in my archive of Princess Anne’s royal hats last week, I found a hat that has undergone subtle transformation. Designed by the late British milliner John Boyd, I believe the hat first appeared in 1983 while on a visit to Japan.

The pale wheat-hued straw brimmed hat with ivory crin overlay was repeated for a May 1985 Buckingham Palace garden party and with a printed dress for the agricultural “East of England” show (in June 1985, 1986 or 1987), both seen below.

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Princess Anne paired this hat with a nautical navy jacket with brass buttons and white trim on June 4, 1986 for the Epsom Races. This outing is probably the most famous for this hat and photos captured at this event provide great views of its shape, trim and detail.

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On June 23, 1990, the hat appeared at Royal Ascot with the addition of a twisted, polka dot hatband.

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For a May 6, 2008 WWII memorial in France, the crown’s crin overlay was removed and an insignia brooch looked to be affixed to the front of the hat.

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The hat’s most recent outing on October 16, 2011  was without the insignia brooch and showed all the original trim – the twisted hatband, back bow and crin swirled rosette on the side – to be intact.

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The removal of the ivory crin over the crown is a minor touch that significantly altered the look of this hat- I can’t help wondering if it was removed for necessity or deemed an easy ‘fix’ to make more fashionable, 30 years after it’s creation? We’ll never know the answer to these questions… but I’m very interested to hear your theories!

Photos from The Asahi Shimbun via Getty; Alan Feeberry;  Getty Images as indicated