Imperial Royal Wedding: Guests

Guests at today’s wedding of Grand Duke George Mikhailovich of Russia and Rebecca Bettarini included several from royal houses, beginning with the groom’s immediate family.

George’s mother, Grand Duchess Mariya Vladimirovna Romanova, wore a pleated blue silk Kokoshnik headpiece with brown sable trim. The headpiece has layered blue silk bows around the back.

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The Grand Duchess’ sister, Helene Kirby, Countess Dvinskaya, wore a hat in the same orange boucle as her suit with a wide brown fur bumper brim.

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The bride’s mother, Carla Virginia Cacciatore, topped her blue and green ruffle collared suit with in a brown hat. The hat features freeform sinamay ruffles atop a shallow pillbox base.

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Crown Princess Elia of Albania wore the loveliest pale gray-green beret percher trimmed with green silk flowers, leaves and a net veil.

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Princess Isabelle of Liechtenstein wore a black velvet pyramid hat with wide faux fur cuffed brim.

Princess Lea of Belgium wore a brown fur Cossack style hat.
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The Duchess of Braganza wore a deep eggplant veiled pillbox placed on the back of her head.

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Princess Marie-Marguerite, Duchess of Anjou, wore a statement oversize saucer in peachy-tan sinamay with steep sidesweep. The hat is trimmed with feathers studded in raw-edge crin and sinamay ruffles en masse beneath the brim on its raised side.

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What do you think of the hats that stepped out today in St. Petersburg for this event?

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Images from Getty and social media as indicated  

Imperial Royal Wedding

The religious marriage of Grand Duke George Mikhailovich of Russia and his longtime Italian partner Rebecca Bettarini took place today at St Isaac’s Cathedral in St. Petersburg, the first Romanov wedding to take place in this cathedral in over 300 years.

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Rebecca’s gown is a collaborative creation made by Reem Acra and Elina Samarina for Sergio Marcone Moscow.

 “Reem Acra has exquisite taste and her gowns are designed holistically as if they were a masterwork of architecture, I had only two requirements: a refined and modern dress made of Italian Silk Mikado, in the classic Italian wedding gowns of the 1960s.” – Rebecca Bettarini

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“The dress is a classic that is made to give a nod to the purity of the symbolism of marriage. Made of European fabric and designed in New York, and worn in Russia it’s a combination of 3 worlds and a tribute to our common roots.” –  Reem Acra

The gown, in ivory Italian Silk Mikado, features a high neckline, fitted bodice, long sleeves, natural waist and a full ballgown skirt.

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A 6-meter long train, created by Russian born designer Elina Samarina, attached from the shoulders.

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Rebecca arrived for the ceremony in a silk tulle veil over her face that extended the full length of the train.

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Elina Samarina drew from Russia’s long, rich tradition of embroidery, using the traditional Torzhok style to embroider the Romanoff family crest onto the silk tulle veil in gold thread.

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 “It pays a joint tribute to the Italian and Russian culture. It showcases a blend of Russian craftsmanship and Italian elegance. It connects with symbols and motifs every Russian can identify with. It expresses continuity between the present and the past, and it’s issued of a high skilled collaboration between our countries.”  – Elina Samarina

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Rebecca topped the veil with Chaumet’s “Lactis” tiara, a modern retake on the traditional Russian Kokoshnik shape.

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Following the ceremony, Rebecca removed the cape train and veil to lay her white orchid bouquet on the graves of Grand Duke George’s grandparents, Grand Duke Vladimir and Grand Duchess Leonida, in the Cathedral of St Peter and St Paul. The resulting photographs give great view of the silhouette of her gown and tiara.

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Rebecca’s attendants wore gold and dark green velvet Tudor style pearl trimmed dresses with matching Kokoshnik headpieces made by Russian brand Russkaya Korona

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For tonight’s gala dinner, Rebecca, who will now be known as HSH Princess Victoria Romanovna Romanoff, wore a hand embroidered silk tulle gown also by Reem Acra. Elina Samarina added another Russian-designed element to the ensemble with a white silk Mikado cape inspired by traditional designs and embroidered in a Torzhok style. It looks like her bridal tiara was placed further back on her head, a look I much prefer.

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What do you think of this Imperial bridal look?

Jump over to these posts for additional coverage of this event:

Imperial Royal Wedding: Family and Guests
Civil Wedding Ceremony

Images from Getty as indicated  

Wedding Trio

We kick off this new week with a look at the three weddings which took place over the weekend. On Friday, the civil marriage of Grand Duke George of Russia and Rebecca Bettarini took place in Moscow.

 

Prince Jaime de Bourbon-Siciles, Duke of Noto, was married to Lady Charlotte Lindesay-Bethune on Saturday at Monreale Cathedral in Sicily.  The bride’s father, the 16th Earl of Lindsay, is a prominent Scottish businessman and politician and presumably, her delicate diamond tiara is a family piece. The groom’s mother, Sofía Landaluce y Melgarejo, Duchess of Calabria, wore a black lace mantilla with high peineta comb. See a gallery of the event here.

 

On Saturday, Princess Marie-Astrid of Liechtenstein married Ralph Worthington at the Orbetello Cathedral in Capalbio, Italy. The bride wore the diamond Kinsky Honeysuckle Tiara from the Liechtenstein royal family’s collection. The time and subsequent dress code for these nuptials did not, unfortunately, include hats. See a gallery of the event here.

Lovely royal bridal looks all around, don’t you agree?!

Images from Getty as indicated  

Monaco Royal Wedding: Guests from Non-Reigning Royal Houses

We wrap up our week-long look at the hats worn to Prince Albert and Princess Charlene’s religious wedding on July 2, 2011 with those worn by guests from non-reigning royal houses.

Empress Farah wore a pleated turban in the same lime green silk as her jacket and dress that tied at the back in a bow. It was a very coordinated look with subtle contrast provided by the use of both matte and shiny sides of the fabric twisted together and narrow fringe on the bottom of the back bow’s tie.

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Princess Marina of Savoy wore a picture hat in layered navy and black straw, sharply raised on one side and simply trimmed with a slim black straw hatband. The layered straw gives an interesting effect, merging the two colours surprisingly well, especially with the top layer of the straw brim cut shorter than the bottom navy layer to give some lightness to the design around the outer brim’s edge. On its own the hat was great. It’s the pairing with this feather-hemmed, bedazzled, cocktail-all-the-way dress that gives me issue. It’s a dress that simply doesn’t suit a hat.

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Marina’s daughter-in-law, Princess Clotilde, paired her ruffle trimmed scarlet dress with an oversize flower headpiece in black silk. While the black accessories work with the dress, I’d have preferred a sleeker percher hat to provide a more streamlined counterpoint for the statement dress.

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Princess Camilla of Bourbon-Two Sicilies is well known for her dramatic sartorial choices and attended this event in the ultimate (most literal? cheesiest?) symbol of love. Her large heart-shaped hat was covered in the same pink silk as her outfit, emphasized with the same magenta handpainted ombre effect as on the collar of her jacket. Well known to be one of Prince Albert’s closest friends, I always wondered if Camilla’s pink statement of love was directed at the unfortunate rumours that plagued the run up to this event… or if this was always her plan. My guess is the latter. Either way, it was quite a hat.

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Maria Margarita de Bourbon, Duchess of Anjou, paired her beautifully embellished grey dress with a statement hat in slightly lighter grey straw. The design was lavishly trimmed with grey silk oversize roses and crystal studded cut feathers placed below the brim of the saucer’s raised side.

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Princess Micaëla of Orleans wore a warm tan-hued raffia sun hat with wide, pleated brim from the Madagascar Hat Company. A twisted sash hatband in the same magenta silk as her skirt was added to the hat, presumably to link the ensemble together.

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The Duchess of Bragança paired her pale blue silk suit with a simple ecru straw hat with flat crown and upturned kettle brim.

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Crown Princess Margarita of Romania was a sunny vision in yellow with wide brimmed hat. The design, by Romanian milliner Kristina Dragomir, featured a shallow, flat crown and gently downcurved brim and was trimmed with a yellow silk hatband and swath of dotted veil wrapped around the crown and tied in a bow across the back. I’m not always a fan of one-colour looks but this shade of yellow is so happy and well suited to Margarita (and successfully grounded by the cream accessories and pearl jewellery) that I can’t help but like it.

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Crown Princess Katherine of Serbia paired her ice blue silk beaded dress and jacket with a feminine headpiece of large white and blue ombre flower petal ruffles trimmed with loops of blue tube crin. I can see how the headpiece linked with her ensemble and I love the unconventional design but I think a less fussy piece (anything that didn’t look like layered cabbage leaves) would have been a better option.

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Grand Duchess Maria Vladimirovna of Russia wore a tall, peaked Kokoshnik-style headpiece in the same floral silk as her dress. Maria’s committment to this traditional Russian millinery shape is admirable (she has worn the shape many times over the years) but this particularly combination of headpiece and dress (with those drapery-esque sleeves) was a LOT of look.

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Princess Sophie of Isenburg, who would marry Prince Georg Friedrich of Prussia a month later, paired her colorful couture dress and jacket with an equally vibrant headpiece. Built on a pale beigey-pink silk abaca bandeau with swishy curving edge, the headpiece was trimmed with a birdcage veil, an over-arc of black burnt feathers and a trio of blue, caramel and pink flower feathers on the side. There are countless reasons not to like the headpiece with the ensemble that I continue to ignore, simply because it was of the few ensembles at this event that felt free and fun.

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Stephanie, Hereditary Princess of Baden, wore a giant ivory silk chiffon rose headpiece with petal edges tinged in pink. I love a millinery statement but this this one was dulled by her ‘whole lot of biscuit’ ensemble. Princess Ursula of Bavaria, on the other hand, played up her black straw bow headpiece with feathers, pairing it with a black and white suit. The feather work on this headpiece is worth a second look- a fantastic dahlia flower of black and white striped goose biot feathers with a red center was surrounded by dotted pheasant feathers with a firework display of black coque feathers shooting around the top and side.  Yes, it’s dated now but I still love its bold design and scale.

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Princess Virginia von Fürstenberg, who had been a longtime friend and companion to the widowed Prince Rainier, topped her navy silk dress and scarf and lace jacket with a shiny straw cloche hat in the same colour. The design was simply trimmed with a navy hatband and wide binding around the extended brim.

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That wraps up our look at the Monaco royal wedding nine years ago, and the 44 royal hats and headpieces that attended its multi-day celebration. Which hats in this last group stand out to you most? Which overall royal hat at this event was your favourite?

Jump to this post for an index of other royal hats that appeared at this wedding. 

Photos from Getty as indicated 

Centenary of Deaths of Russian Imperial Royal Family

Yesterday marked the 100 anniversary of the deaths of Tsar Nicholas II and his family and the end of the Russian Imperial royal dynasty.  Commemorations were held in St. Petersburg, including the unveiling of a memorial statue of the late czar, his wife and children, a memorial service and the reburial of remains of two children, Alexei and Maria, with the rest of the family.

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Prince and Princess Michael of Kent attended, the princess in a black lace veil (click on bottom photo below and scroll to last photo. Also in attendance was Princess Olga Romanoff, great niece of Nicholas II (granddaughter of the Tsar’s younger sister Grand Duchess Xenia), in an elegant black straw pillbox hat trimmed with dotted veil, crin leaves and bows by British milliner Laura Cathcart.



In Yekaterinburg, large memorial procession marked the route from the murder site to a monastery. Self-proclaimed Princess Olga Kulikovskaya-Romanova, widow of  Tsar Nicholas’ nephew Tikhon Nikolaevich Kulikovsky (son of Grand Duchess Olga) attended the procession in a purple straw cloche variation with flat topped crown wrapped in a wide lighter purple hatband.
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Even a hundred years on, the complexity of factors surrounding this tragic royal event is difficult to comprehend. This is, however, a major anniversary and that’s why I decided to cover it. I also recommend this this interview with Princess Olga that appeared in The Telegraph back in March which gives interesting insight into the post-Imperial life experienced by members of the Romanoff family who were able to leave Russia.
Photos from social media and Getty as indicated