Imperial Enthronement: Ceremony

The main element in Tuesday’s Imperial Enthronement was the Sokuirei-Seiden-no-Gi, an official proclamation ceremony where the new emperor announces to domestic and foreign audiences that he has ascended the Chrysanthemum Throne.

Embed from Getty Images

This ceremony took place inside the Imperial Palace before a large audience. Emperor Naruhito again appeared in sokutai robes, this time in the dark rust-brown colour reserved for his role, and the distinctive black kanmuri hat.

Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images
Embed from Getty Images

Empress Masako wore a traditional “junihitoe” multi-layered kimono which dates back to the Heian Era (794 to 1185). In white, silver, red, coral,  purple, pale peach and green, the kimono is regal and dramatic, especially paired with the the elaborate sculpted sweeping ponytail that is worn with this costume along with a triple pronged golden headpiece.

Embed from Getty Images
Embed from Getty Images

Crown Prince Fumihito wore saffron orange sokutai robes and a black kanmuri hat.

Embed from Getty Images

The Imperial princesses also wore the traditional junihitoe with Crown Princess Kiko in shades of red, pink, orange, gold, white and purple, with a top robe in slate navy and the others in layers of green, navy, red, burgundy, yellow and white with a top robe in royal purple. Each wore the traditional spiky gold headpieces atop the costume’s dramatic hairstyle.

Embed from Getty Images
Embed from Getty Images
Crown Princess Kiko

Embed from Getty Images
Princess Kako and Princess Mako

Embed from Getty Images
Princess Hanako

Embed from Getty Images
Princess Hanako and Princess Nobuko in front; Princesses Akiko, Yoko, Hisako and Tsuguko in back

On their own, these spiky headpieces and tall hats seem so unusual but somehow, they add to the grandeur and strong sense of history at these events.

Embed from Getty Images

Next up, we’ll look at the hats worn by royal guests.

Photos from Getty as indicated