Monday Multiples: Queen Elizabeth

Thanks to Jimbo for providing the introduction and background research for this “Monday Multiples” post.

Jimbo’s Introduction: Today’s pair of hats, made of the same very palest blue material as Queen Elizabeth’s dress and coat, are quite different in style.  Both are adorned with a single ostrich feather, giving each hat a wonderfully light and airy, whimsical touch, great for outdoor events with a little breeze.  The original brimless hat from 2012 was replaced by a very typical, business-as-usual shape in 2017, which we have all come to know and recognize as perhaps her current trademark style.

Look #1: A formed beret with tall peak on one side, trimmed with a button-anchored upright white ostrich feather designed by Angela Kelly and made by Stella McLaren first worn November 27, 2012 to welcome a Kuwaiti state visit and repeated March 17, 2016 at the London Zoo.

Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images
Embed from Getty Images

Look #2: A slightly flared crown hat with upturned kettle brim trimmed with the same button-anchored white ostrich feather placed diagonally across the front of the hat, also designed by Angela Kelly and made by Stella McLaren, first worn May 13, 2017 at the Royal Windsor Horse Show. 

Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images

The sweeping collar on Her Majesty’s coat is a unique style feature for her- which hat do you prefer most itt?

Photos from Getty as indicated 

22 thoughts on “Monday Multiples: Queen Elizabeth

  1. I like Hat #1 best purely because it was so unusual for HM and reminded me a lot of what Queen Mary used to wear. Hat #2 is perfectly fine, but she has so many other similar ones. The coat and it’s portrait collar is fabulous, the perfect setting for her daily brooches!

  2. When she wears a similar shape all the time it becomes a uniform. Since no one wears that kind of uniform in my circle it also appears a bit like a costume to me. The first hat is different so gets away from that whole issue

    I’m not sure why but the first hat really opens her face and the color is lovely. The second is the same color but isn’t very flattering

  3. I like both of these outfits, and I say outfits advisedly, since I think both ensembles of hats and coat work well together. I agree with others that possibly the second one looks slightly more suited to the Queen’s face, but I really like the variety embodied in the first hat, and as it is still a good look, I will plump for that one!

  4. I’m going to admit here that I’ve never liked the hat in Look #1 — it’s fine as a hat (i.e. just as a standalone article of clothing) but I don’t think this shape flatters HM at all! But responding to JamesB’s comment wondering why a second hat might have been made (yes, I know, you all have debunked my earlier suggestion that the first hat was left on a chair and sat on!), but maybe the first one wasn’t comfortable, or on giving it a closer look when she was actually out and about in it, HM just decided she didn’t like it. It wouldn’t be the first time someone loved an item when they bought it and then wondered what has possessed them once they got it home!

    But here’s a more specific question about both of these hats — the feather is referred to above as a WHITE ostrich feather. I have looked at all of these photos on both my laptop and tablet, and it sure looks blue to me. Do I need my eyes examined?

  5. I’m quite surprised that a replacement hat was made for this outfit. The first one is very chic and didn’t need retiring or an alternative.

    She’s done this a few times there’s a lilac outfit for instance which acquired a replacement hat inexplicably. lEmbed from Getty Images

    • The wearing of the new hat with this outfit also saw a renovation to the coat – the collar was remodelled

      Embed from Getty Images

  6. On reading these comments, most of what I wanted to say has been said! I much prefer the first hat, as a hat and love the way the swooshes complement each other. It is really interesting and has flare in several senses. But..I think old faithful and a bit boringly designed brimmed hat actually suits HM better. Darn it!

  7. Maybe some Royal Hat admirers out there will find the following slightly-off-tangent story of interest. Last year, Queen Elizabeth was presented with 2 new portraits, one was commissioned by the RAF Regiment to celebrate their 75th anniversary, the other one celebrating the 100th anniversary of the RAF Club. Here we see the dress with the same swoosh collar, without the coat or either hat. Could both portraits have been created during the same sittings? Very interesting. The 2nd painting appears to have a deeper blue presence about it, which I actually like better. Probably for this reason we don’t see a lot of tan and pale grey on HM. Wouldn’t it be strange to look at 2 different artists’ renderings of one’s self? It would be interesting to read her mind. Enjoy.

    October 17, 2018: RAF Club
    November 30, 2018: Windsor Castle

    Embed from Getty Images

    • Jimbo, I’ve seen both of these portraits (online, not in person!) and never noticed that she was wearing the same dress! I don’t think these were painted during the same sitting, since the chair and background are totally different, and I’m not sure she’s wearing the same brooch on the dress, but apart from that, regarding different artist renderings of oneself, I wonder if you’re familiar with the event where 25 members of the New York Portrait Society in 2007 simultaneously painted Justice Sandra Day O’Connor on the occasion of her retirement. Unfortunately, the website showing the finished paintings is no longer online, but I remember seeing video of the actual event on television at the time, and it was pretty amazing seeing so many different interpretations of one woman all done at the same time.

  8. I much prefer the first look. Not only is it a departure from HM the Queen’s usual sort of hat style, it reminds me just a bit of HM Queen Mary’s signature toques. Not as in copying, but just perhaps “inspired by.”

  9. I prefer the first hat because it is a departure on style for Her Majesty. Although I prefer brimmed hats as a rule, I like variety above all else. The lines of the hat mirror the collar and the feathers add height. I would like to see it taken out for a repeat wearing.

    • James, you have a good eye for detail – lines mirroring one another – I didn’t notice that until you and better.than.scrubs mentioned it. When you say you’d like to see it taken out for a repeat wearing, do you mean the hat or the desire for the feather’s removal? (from the previous sentence)
      Here’s a decent close-up shot from another outing, possibly its 2nd one. I really like the button attachment for the ostrich feather.

      January 27, 2013: leaving St. Mary Magdalene Church, Sandringham
      Embed from Getty Images

      • Apologies it wasn’t clear – that’s particularly bad as I’m an English graduate. I meant I would like to see the first hat brought out for another appearance.

  10. I like how the swoop of the first hat mirrors the collar, but the shape is more interesting than flattering. I prefer the second hat.

    • better.than.scrubs:
      1. I agree with you 100%, and I love your phraseology: “the shape is more interesting than flattering.” I also prefer the 2nd hat’s tried-and-true shape.
      2. Does “scrubs” refer to your line of work, or the old TV show, now gone almost 10 years? You have a nice name, and again I agree with you: Royal Hats is much better than work.

  11. Thanks Jimbo for another great post.

    This was so difficult as both hats are great, but I lean slightly more to Look #2, for the exact reason you indicated. It’s a “business-as-usual shape, which we have all come to know and recognize as perhaps her current trademark style.”

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