British Royal Extended Family at Trooping the Colour

After looking at hats worn by the Queen’s children and grandchildren for Trooping the Colour, let’s close out coverage of this colourful event with a look at the hats worn by the extended British Royal Family.

Princess Alexandra wore a dove grey hat with high, moulded crown and wide brim. The crown was wrapped in a three braided cords which opened to tie into a multi-corded bow at the front. It’s an interesting that that falls a little flat for me, especially after seeing Alexandra in that beautiful sky blue picture hat last week. I think this Kent princess looks prettiest in millinery with a bit more colour.

Princess Alexandra, June 14, 2014 | Royal Hats

Designer: I suspect Rachel Trevor Morgan
Previously Worn: June 4, 2009June 19, 2006; this unknown event

There was no vibrancy missing in Lady Helen Taylor’s ensemble. She topped her modern magenta and raspberry suit with a matching stacked brimless hat trimmed in tulle net tails. While my description does this hat great injustice, I thought it was unusual, creative and exceptionally striking on fashion-forward Helen. This is not a hat I would pick to top most royal heads but I loved it all the same.

Lady Helen Taylor, June 14, 2014 | Royal Hats

Lady Helen Taylor, June 14, 2014 | Royal Hats

Designer: Stephen Jones
Previously Worn: I believe this is a new hat

Princess Michael of Kent combined two of her favourite millinery looks in this ice blue giant pillbox trimmed with what appears to be a giant ostrich feather at the back. I thought the feather added some softness to the hat and made its scale work to greater success. With her caped coat, the whole look was very glamorous, dramatic and oh-so Marie Christine.

Princess Michael of Kent, June 14, 2014 in John Boyd | Royal Hats

Designer: unknown. John Boyd
Previously Worn: I think this is a new hat

Princess Michael’s daughter and daughter-in-law wore a pair of beautiful picture hats. Lady Gabriella Windsor wore a pale picture hat with wide brim trimmed with spiky pale grey bow tails. It is a dramatic hat that worked well with Gabriella’s modern ensemble. Lady Frederick Windsor wore a white lampshade style hat trimmed with an oversize white bow. This hat has potential to look overly sweet but when paired with tSophie’s tailored pale blue coat dress, it provided a feminine contrast.

Lady Gabriella Windsor and Lady Frederick Windsor, June 14, 2014

Designer of Lady Gabriella’s hat: Philip Treacy. I believe this is a new hat
Designer of Lady Frederick’s hat: unknown. I think this is also a new hat

Lady Sarah Chatto also joined the Royal Family for their appearance on the balcony of Buckingham Palace on Saturday. She repeated a cream saucer hat that looks simultaneously modern and classic on her. I particularly liked its pairing with her sunny patterned yellow skirt.

Lady Sarah Chatto in Stephen Jones and Lady Gabriella Windsor in Philip Treacy, June 14, 2014

Designer of Lady Sarah’s hat: Stephen Jones
Previously Worn: April 20, 2013June 5, 2012June 10, 2011

The Countess of St. Andrews (below, far right) repeated her navy straw beret topped with a large pouf of tulle and feathers. The Duchess of Gloucester repeated her navy straw beret (below, right) while the Countess of Ulster topped her navy dress with a magenta brimless cocktail hat. Zenouska Mowatt looked wonderful in Jane Taylor’s ‘Eliza’ hat, described by the designer as an “elegant straw upturn disc with angular lace printed feathers and delicate rolled organdy bow”.  And finally, Lady Marina Windsor wore a large pale pink saucer hat with rolled top rim and a spray of flowers under the top brim.

Duchess of Gloucester, Countess of Ulster, Zenouska Mowatt and Amelia Windsor, June 14, 2014 | Royal Hats Countess of St. Andrews, June 14, 2014 | Royal Hats

All in all, a fantastic day of British royal hats, don’t you think?

Photos from UK Press via The Daily MailMax Mumby, Max MumbyMax Mumby, Chris Jackson, and Mark CuthbertChris Jackson/Getty via Zimbio

12 thoughts on “British Royal Extended Family at Trooping the Colour

    • I only see reference to Zanouska in this link, but I do believe the young lady in pink is Lady Amelia, youngest daughter of the St. Andrews.

  1. While I like Lady Gabriella’s hat (and her elan in the wearing of it), I don’t like that we can see only one of her eyes from under the brim! It almost seems as if the crown is slightly too big and it’s sitting too low on her head.

  2. I liked Lady Sarah’s outfit, especially her hat. Very 1950s. Lady Helen’s hat was fabulous. Princess Michael of Kent, whilst elegant, looked forbidding and slightly scary.

  3. Love Lady Helen’s whole look – she’s always interesting in her choices. Funny how the minor royals could wear brights (see also Lady Amelia Windsor and Zenouska Mowatt) but the immediate family and the Queen’s cousins were in pastels. Such a lot of co-ordination goes into these massed appearances.

  4. As soon as I saw Princess Alexandra’s hat, I loved it. The shape is just brilliant. I think that the hat is the same but the trim is, I’m pretty sure, different. If you look at previous wearings, it looks like three rather thick pieces of rope, thankfully the look has been softened since then. It looks like the bow has been moved too. PA seems to wear a hat with such comfort and ease, surely part of the secret of a wonderful hat outing. Thankyou.

  5. So excited to see Lady Helen Taylor’s whole hat, but frankly am a little disappointed with the hat itself. I don’t like to raggedy ends flying off to the side, something more structured would have been better IMO though I thought the outfit quite stylish.

    • Yes Sue, Lady Helen’s hat caught my eye immediately too, such dramatic colours. I actually really love it, especially the stacked effect and the way it matches the colours in the outfit so well. It’s a good size for her and such an interesting and different look. I like it!

      • Me too. It has shape, delicious colours artfully arranged, a touch of whimsy and her hair is also beautifully styled for the hat.

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