Mourning Millinery

Numerous hats have been worn over the past 11 days of mourning since Queen Elizabeth’s passing:

September 10: Princess Beatrice in an embellished headband to admire flowers and tributes left outside Balmoral Castle.

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September 11:  Princess Anne wore a repeated black beret with net veil overlay and feather trim by Amy Morris-Adams for the arrival of the Queen’s coffin at Holyrood House in Edinburgh from Balmoral

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September 12: The King, The Princess Royal, Vice Admiral Timothy Laurence and the Earl of Wessex were in military uniform for the procession of The Queen’s coffin from the Palace of Holyroodhouse along the Royal Mile to St Giles’ Cathedral.

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They were joined by Queen Camilla and the Countess of Wessex.

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Queen Camilla: Repeated black straw hat with feather wrap by Philip Treacy
Countess of Wessex: Repeated black felt button percher with draped silk abacca bow by Jane Taylor. 

September 13: Princess Anne attended a prayer service at  St Giles Church and accompanied her mother’s coffin from Scotland to RAF Northolt.

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Princess Anne: Repeated silk covered pillbox with ruffled bow at the back 

Queen Camilla accompanied the King on a visit to Northern Ireland.

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Queen Camilla: Repeated straw brimmed hat with side bow by Lock & Co. 

September 14: King Charles, The Prince of Wales, The Princess Royal, the Earl of Wessex, the Duke of Gloucester  and Vice Admiral Timothy Laurence wore military uniform to follow the Queen’s coffin from Buckingham Palace to the Palace of Westminster. They were joined by the Duke of Sussex, Earl of Snowdon, Peter Philips, Duke of York and members of Queen Elizabeth’s staff.

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At the Palace of Westminster, the group was joined by the British royal family.

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Queen Camilla: New black straw hat with wrapped hatband by Philip Treacy
Princess of Wales: New Black Pillbox Halo in Crepe by Jane Taylor
Duchess of Sussex: New Black Veiled Beret Fascinator with ribbon trim by Stephen Jones
Princess Beatrice: New Waterfall Bow Band by Justine Bradley-Hill
Princess Eugenie: New ‘Galilea’ Headpiece in Black by Emily London
Countess of Wessex: New ‘Aphrodite’ Headpiece in Black Crepe by Jane Taylor
Lady Louise Windsor: New Felt Beret with Quill in Black by Whitely
Zara Tindall: New bespoke by Juliette Botterill

September 16: King Charles, The Princess Royal, the Earl of Wessex and the Duke of York stood vigil at their mother’s coffin in the Palace of Westminster.

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They were joined by members of the Royal family, the York Princesses, Duchess of Gloucester, Lady Rose Gilman, Princess Alexandra, the Countess of St. Andrews, Lady Helen Taylor and her daughters, Lady Frederick Windsor, and the Tindall and Philips families in hats/headpieces.

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Queen Camilla repeated her new black straw hat with wrapped hatband on a visit to Wales with the King.

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The Prince and Princess of Wales visited to Army Training Centre Pirbright in Guilford.

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Princess of Wales: Repeated black felt saucer with raised brim and curled trim by Lock & Co.

September 17: The Prince of Wales, The Duke of Sussex, Princess Beatrice, Princess Eugenie, Lady Louise Windsor, James, Peter Phillips and Zara Tindall stand vigil at their grandmother’s coffin in the Palace of Westminster.

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Princess Beatrice: Repeated Waterfall Bow Band by Justine Bradley-Hill
Zara Tindall: New ‘Darcey’ Black Velvet Veiled Headband (without the embellishments) by Bee Smith

Empress Masako wore bumper hats departing for and arriving in London

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September 18: Queen Silvia of Sweden and Crown Princess Marie-Chantal at the Palace of Westminster.

 

Images from Getty and social media as indicated  

11 thoughts on “Mourning Millinery

  1. Thank you HatQueen for lovely coverage during this eventful period. Everyone looked particularly stellar, I’m sure as a tribute to QEII. Mourning attire seems so simple in theory but can be tricky in practice with lots of things to think about. Case in point, the bandeau/headbands on the granddaughters at their vigil, which I particularly liked. Not only was it unified but also had the added benefit of possibly staying on better with heads bowed and also allowed their faces to be seen. And yet individual enough to show their personalities as well.

  2. Is the beret style hat Lady Louise wore not one of Kate’s old hats? I saw it somewhere that it was the same hat. Looks the same just eh bow is a bit flattened like its been in storage?

    • We will likely never know if Louise borrowed/was gifted Kate’s hat (although I love the idea that it was!). What I do know is it is a style produced by Whitely and has been in production for over a decade.

  3. Thank you so much, HatQueen, for assembling this collection of hats worn during this solemn period. This will be a valuable post to return to in the future. Thank you also for the previous posts looking back at HM’s early years.

    I have a hat-related protocol question which may be appropriate to put here in case anyone knows the answer. I noticed that — with the exception of the vigil — on all of the occasions when the family members were in military dress, the men removed their hats before entering the various buildings, but Princess Anne did not. Was this because, even though she was in uniform, she was adhering to the custom that women leave their hats on, or was this because the particular branch of the military that she represents maintains the custom of leaving the hat on? I am just curious.

    • Matthew, the following photos don’t necessarily answer your question about millinery etiquette, but I found them very interesting. I randomly chose the 2006 and 2007 Trooping the Colours as examples. It occurred with Princess Anne many times during this event through the years.

      June 17, 2006: (military hat on balcony)
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      June 16, 2007: (NO military hat on balcony)
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  4. I echo the continued thanks for your coverage HatQueen, despite the enormity of this occasion and knowing you are still “out of office”. I also agree with Maja it is interesting to see the personal interpretations and expressions of mourning, especially as I like to express myself through clothing and see how others do the same.

  5. Thank you, Hat Queen for this collection. It has been interesting to see all the different hats worn over these days of mourning.

  6. What a thoughtfully understated round-up, HatQueen. I’ve been stunned by number of appearances, many hatted, by the royal family in the last week. Everyone has looked so dignified and elegant. I agree with Jimbo: Camilla’s new Phillip Treacy and Kate’s felt saucer are my favorites, too. I wondered whether the granddaughters coordinated to all wear bandeau headpieces for the Vigil. It made for a unified look that did not distract from the solemn occasion.

  7. HQ, you have done an amazing job here – thank you so much. Watching all the proceedings this past week has been fascinating, sad, and profound. I just printed off the 22 page program of today’s State Funeral. Inspirational and beautiful to say the least.
    PS I love Camilla’s new hat by Philip Treacy, and Kate’s felt saucer.

  8. Thank you for collecting all these hats in one post. While this is not a fashion event, I like to keep track of hats worn. It’s also interesting to see how people interpret mourning dressing.

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